Category Archives: Bug Reports

Window Tabbing Pox

macOS Sierra introduces a new system-wide window tabbing feature, which by default enables tabs within the windows of most document-based apps. Apple’s own TextEdit is a canonical example: open the app and select View -> Show Tab Bar to see how it looks.

Unfortunately, the default tabbing behaviors doesn’t make sense in all apps, even if they are document-based. I’ve had to disable the functionality in both MarsEdit and Black Ink, at least for the time being. Doing so is easy. Just add the following line somewhere early in the lifetime of your app:

NSWindow.allowsAutomaticWindowTabbing = NO;

This class property on NSWindow shuts the whole window tabbing system out of your app, so you don’t have to fuss with how to disable it on a window-by-window basis. Handy!

Unfortunately, setting that property to NO doesn’t do anything about windows that may already have been created, and which have their tab bar visible. I added the line to my app delegate’s applicationDidFinishLaunching: method, assuming that would take care of everything. After all, any documents will be instantiated later in the app’s lifetime, right? Right?

Wrong. Not with window restoration, at least, which causes a freeze-drying and restoration of open document windows when a user quits and relaunches the app. The window in this circumstance is actually created before applicationDidFinishLaunching. If it had its tab bar visible when you quit, it will have the tab bar visible when it’s restored, even if you’ve since disabled all window tabbing for the app.

What’s worse? Showing or hiding the tab bar on any window sets that choice as the default for all future windows in the app. So even new documents that are created by users, and which don’t have their tab bar visible because you’ve disabled it app-wide, will have a tab bar appended when they are restored at launch time, because “Show Tab Bar” was the last user action before disabling tabbing altogether.

The long and short of it? An app stuck in this situation will not have a View -> Show/Hide Tab Bar, and none of its windows will support tabbing, except for any document that is restored at launch time. Even new documents that are created without tab bars will have the tab bar imposed the next launch.

I filed Radar 28578742, suggesting that setting NSWindow.allowsAutomaticWindowTabbing=NO should also turn off window tabbing for any open windows that have it enabled.

If your app gets stuck in this predicament, one workaround is to move the NSWindow.allowsAutomaticWindowTabbing=NO line to an even earlier point in your app’s lifetime, such as in your app’s main.m or main.swift file.

Dynamic Development Team

The first Xcode 8 beta was released at WWDC, and includes a major revision to the way code signing is handled by default. You can watch the video or read the slides on Apple’s WWDC Videos page.

A major change from Xcode 7 is that Xcode now requires that every target in your project specify a development team, even when the manual code signing option is selected.

This is a nuisance to developers who have fine-tuned their code signing process such that signing is configured elsewhere: for example, in a centralized Xcode configuration file that imparts signing information to all projects in an organization.

The problem is worse for open source projects, where a project may be expected to be checked out and built by a variety of organizations. In this scenario, each organization will have to somehow automate the insertion of a valid team name and ID in the project file after every checkout or update.

The DevelopmentTeam and DevelopmentTeamName values are stored in the Xcode project file, so they can’t be defined in Xcode configuration files the way so many other settings that affect build behaviors can.

Xcode needs some mechanism for providing these values without manually, permanently altering the affected project files. I would welcome either a mechanism for specifying the values in the Xcode configuration file specified for the project, or a wildcard type value that can be selected to indicate the “default team” should be used.

(Radar #26892618)

Update: It turns out my wishes are already answered. The new PROVISIONING_PROFILE_SPECIFIER build setting will impart the desired team information to Xcode, even if provisioning profiles are not used. So, something like this in my Xcode configuration file:

PROVISIONING_PROFILE_SPECIFIER = 493CVA9A35/

Quiets all of Xcode’s gripes about requiring a team name, and doesn’t require that I tediously update every last target with explicit team information. This doesn’t exactly solve the challenge for open source projects, because organizations using an open source project will still have to override the configuration file or build settings for the projects they check out. As far as I know there is no way to define PROVISIONING_PROFILE_SPECIFIER generically, the way you can specify code signing identities as e.g. “Mac Developer”. It would be great if open source projects could declare a PROVISIONING_PROFILE_SPECIFIER (when needed) as:

PROVISIONING_PROFILE_SPECIFIER = Automatic/

And allow the host project’s prevailing team identity automatically apply. But, I am satisfied to know this at least doesn’t need to be manually set everywhere in order to continue building my projects successfully.

Careful What You Wish For

I am a well-known proponent of bug filing. In fact, I filed a bug last year that argued Xcode should apply the custom Code Signing Flags for a project when code signing the bundled Swift libraries that are installed in in an app’s bundle.

I noticed that at some point along the way, Apple did fix the bug! Exciting! Time to rejoice, no? Well, no. Because while the fix for the bug addressed my original complaint, it brought a new headache which I hadn’t anticipated.

For my app MarsEdit, I supply a custom designated requirement for the code signing phase. The long and short of this approach is that through careful specification of a designated requirement, you can arrange it so that if the user stores an item in the keychain from one version of your app (say the Mac App Store version), then the same app can access the data later without prompting the user, even if it has a different bundle ID, or is signed by a different identity (say, because it’s a direct sale version).

The problem I’m running into now, as I dabble with adding Swift-based code to MarsEdit, is the bundled Swift libraries are being signed with my app’s custom designated requirement. Oops. This never would have happened if Apple hadn’t … fixed the bug I reported.

I’m not sure what the right solution is, or even how to best approach a workaround. The copying of Swift libraries and their subsequent signing is not only opaque to developers, but it happens after the entire user-configurable build process is done. It seems as though to work around the problem in such a way that I can still supply a designated requirement for my app, I may need to avoid adding the flag to OTHER_CODE_SIGNING_FLAGS, and amend the designated requirement on my own sometime after the Xcode build process is complete.

I find the code signing configuration options to be pretty troubling for this reason, among others. The highest level code signing identity (and now flags) are used implicitly by Xcode for some code signing operations that are opaque to developers. It puts us in a bind when something subtle turns out to be not quite right with the resulting built product.

I filed a new bug, Radar #25579693, to raise the issue with Apple about the can of worms that fixing my previous report has caused. In the mean time, I’m on the hunt for workarounds! I’ll update this post when I feel I’ve got something good.

NSURLSession Authentication Challenge Disparity

Thanks to a bunch of my networking-related unit tests failing on 10.11, I came to the conclusion that NSURLSession’s authentication challenge mechanism changed from 10.11 with respect to the way HTTP Basic Auth challenges are handled.

In 10.10 a data task that is created for a resource protected by HTTP Basic Auth will result in a callback whose protection space method is identified as “NSURLAuthenticationMethodDefault”, while in 10.11 the same code accessing the same resource yields a protection space method “NSURLAuthenticationMethodHTTPBasic”.

The problem here is that existing challenge-handling code may have been written to handle the 10.10 behavior, looking for HTTP Basic Auth challenges like this:

if ([[challenge protectionSpace] authenticationMethod] == NSURLAuthenticationMethodDefault)
{
	// Handle the challenge
	...
}

While on 10.11 the “Handle the challenge” code will never be reached, so this shipping code will fail to function.

I think a robust workaround (that unfortunately requires re-compiling and re-shipping) is to test HTTP authentication challenges for either NSURLAuthenticationMethodDefault or NSURLAuthenticationMethodHTTPBasic, and treat them both as equivalent.

I filed this as Radar #21918904, and wrote a message in the developer forums in case people want to discuss the issue or the merits of various workarounds.

Swift Libraries Code Signing

I wrote last year about problems arising from Developer ID signed apps and their dependence upon an Apple “timestamp server” during the code signing phase. In the article, I describe a workaround for scenarios where the timestamp server is either down or there is no internet connection: disable the functionality by adding “–timestamp=none” to the OTHER_CODE_SIGN_FLAGS Xcode build setting.

Swift based apps currently install a complete copy of the Swift standard libraries in the built app’s bundle, and during this phase, Xcode implicitly signs the Swift libraries with whatever code signing identity is defined by the project and/or target. Unfortunately in doing so, it ignores the OTHER_CODE_SIGN_FLAGS build setting, removing the opportunity to finesse code signing of the Swift libraries in the way I described.

The long and short of it? You can’t build a Developer ID based Swift application when you’re offline. I discovered this recently when I dug into a Swift application in a jet, high above the Pacific. Hours of uninterrupted, focused development time lay before me, but I was met with this annoying build failure:

The timestamp service is not available.
*** error: Couldn't codesign [...]/My.app/Contents/Frameworks/libswiftCore.dylib: codesign failed with exit code 1
Command [...]/XcodeDefault.xctoolchain/usr/bin/swift-stdlib-tool failed with exit code 1

The workaround is to turn off code signing completely, or to switch to a Mac App Store code signing identity (which doesn’t rely upon the timestamp service feature of the code sign tool). I filed this bug as a Radar #21891588.